Irish Storyteller

By George Denis Zimmermann

Supported by documents, many of which were not readily available or have never been published before, this book studies images of the 'Irish traditional storyteller' offered at different periods, from several viewpoints and for various purposes. Invariables, changes, ruptures and the effect of conflicting attitudes and ideologies are identified. Contextualized in Irish history and on the wider European scene, this huge book explores the testimony of early antiquarians, accounts of meetings with storytellers by 18th- or 19th-century travelers, representations of acts of elite storytelling in ancient Irish literature or of popular ones in oral tradition itself and in fiction in English - attention is given to the works of Maria Edgeworth, Lady Morgan, the Banim brothers and Griffin, Carleton, Lover, Le Fanu, Somerville and Ross, Yeats, Synge, George Moore and Joyce, and some more recent authors. The evolution of the aims and methods of folklorists, from the Romantic Age to the institutionalization of collecting and to modern ethnographic projects, and the links between definitions of folklore and cultural nationalism are investigated, as are the complex relationships between storytelling, history and truth and the concepts of Irishness and tradition. Another section tries to establish what is known of actual storytelling in the 19th century and in the first half of the 20th: the tellers' training, their techniques and conception of tradition, their status, the etiquette of performance and the role of the audience. Themes and formal characteristics of different kinds of oral narratives are examined.

Publication Date: 9/19/2001
Format: Cloth
ISBN: 9781851826223