Regulating Policing

The Police and Criminal Evidence Act 1984 Past, Present and Future

Edited by: Ed Cape, Richard Young

The UK's Police and Criminal Evidence Act 1984 (PACE) was an innovative and controversial attempt to regulate the investigation of crime. Two decades on, it now operates in a very different context than in the mid-1980s. While legal advice has become established as a basic right of those arrested and detained by the police, the police service has become both increasingly professionalized but also increasingly driven by government objectives and targets. The Crown Prosecution Service, originally established to separate prosecution from investigation, is now becoming involved in the investigative process with the power to make charge decisions. Although the basic structure of PACE has survived, almost continual revision and amendment has resulted in a markedly different creature than that which was originally enacted. Further changes are imminent as the UK government has embarked on a further review of PACE, promising to re-focus the investigation and evidence gathering processes to deliver 21st century policing powers to meet the demands of 21st century crime. This collection brings together some of the leading academic experts, police officers, and defense lawyers who have a wealth of experience of researching and working with the PACE provisions. They examine the critical questions and issues surrounding PACE, providing unique and exciting insights into the demands and challenges of the regulation of policing.


288 pages

Publication Date: 9/30/2008
Format: Paper
ISBN: 9781841138619